ORIGINAL PAPER
Simulator sickness and the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire in Polish practice. A study involving professional drivers subject to compulsory initial and periodic qualification courses
 
More details
Hide details
1
Uniwersytet Medyczny im. Karola Marcinkowskiego w Poznaniu / Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland (Wydział Nauk o Zdrowiu, Katedra i Zakład Psychologii Klinicznej / Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Clinical Psychology)
2
Uniwersytet Medyczny im. Karola Marcinkowskiego w Poznaniu / Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland (Wydział Lekarski I, Katedra Anestezjologii i Intensywnej Terapii, Zakład Dydaktyki Anestezjologii i Intensywnej Terapii / Medical Faculty I, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, Department of Teaching Anaesthesiology and Intensive Therapy)
3
Uniwersytet Medyczny im. Karola Marcinkowskiego w Poznaniu / Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland (Wydział Nauk o Zdrowiu, Pracownia Medycyny Pracy / Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Preventive Medicine)
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Marcin Cybulski   

Uniwersytet Medyczny im. Karola Marcinkowskiego w Poznaniu, Wydział Nauk o Zdrowiu, Katedra i Zakład Psychologii Klinicznej, ul. Bukowska 70, 60-812 Poznań
Online publication date: 2019-12-10
 
Med Pr 2020;71(1):47–58
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
Background: A phenomenon of simulator sickness is measurable in terms of physiological symptoms. The article presents the practical use of the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) in post-exposure research, together with feedback given by the examined drivers. Material and Methods: The study was conducted on the AutoSim AS 1600 simulator, and involved 130 drivers attending preliminary and periodic qualification courses in road transportation. The following tools were used throughout the research: the SSQ by Kennedy et al., translated into Polish by Biernacki et al. (with symptoms including nausea, oculomotor disturbances & disorientation symptoms, and the SSQ total), and a tool evaluating the SSQ (comprehensibility and time consumption on a 1–6 scale). Results: In the study group (N = 130), some statistically significant differences in the SSQ results were observed. Among younger drivers (<29.5 years old) an increased intensity of the simulator sickness symptoms after simulation was recorded (nausea and the SSQ total), and among older drivers (>29.5 years old) – the disorientation symptoms after simulation. The length of sleep and the quality assessment of the conducted task were higher in the asymptomatic groups. Also, the results indicate a positive reception of the tool by the examined individuals (N = 113), with time consumption marked as low (M = 2.44 on a 1–6 scale) and comprehensibility as high (M = 5.62 on a 1–6 scale). Conclusions: The research indicates the occurrence of simulator sickness symptoms even in simulators, which accurately reflect vehicle movements. The feedback given by the examined individuals, together with the level of involvement in the SSQ use, indicates a positive reception of the tool. Med Pr. 2020;71(1):47–58
eISSN:2353-1339
ISSN:0465-5893